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Posts Tagged ‘Beryl Markham’

may books owl

The Great Detective: The Amazing Rise and Immortal Life of Sherlock Holmes, Zach Dundas
More than 120 years after his literary debut, Sherlock Holmes remains instantly recognizable and infinitely adaptable. Dundas – a longtime Sherlock nerd – dives into the Holmesian universe, exploring adaptations, fanfiction, and what makes the character so enduring. Witty, well-researched and so much fun. To review for Shelf Awareness (out June 2).

The Love Song of Miss Queenie Hennessy, Rachel Joyce
This companion novel to The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry (which I loved) tells the life story of Queenie, Harold’s former colleague, and the secrets she has kept for many years. Beautifully written, but deeply, agonizingly sad.

Lowcountry Boneyard, Susan M. Boyer
Private eye Liz Talbot searches for a wealthy young woman who has disappeared from Charleston, S.C., while juggling her complicated personal and professional lives. I like Liz, but the writing and mystery plot just didn’t do it for me. (I received a copy of this book from the publisher.)

Tiny Little Thing, Beatriz Williams
Christina “Tiny” Hardcastle has built a seemingly perfect life for herself as the perfect Boston society wife. But during one fateful summer, her personal life and her husband’s political campaign are rocked by long-hidden secrets. Deliciously scandalous, gorgeously written. To review for Shelf Awareness (out June 23).

The Penderwicks in Spring, Jeanne Birdsall
The Penderwick siblings return for a fourth adventure, in which Batty (the fourth sister) discovers she can sing, starts a dog-walking business, and wrestles with a terrible secret. I love this series about a noisy, happy family, and this one was sweet and fun.

A Dangerous Place, Jacqueline Winspear
After several years away from England, Maisie Dobbs is on her way home – but she makes an unscheduled stop in Gibraltar (rocked by the Spanish Civil War) and stumbles onto a mystery. I adore Winspear’s series about her intrepid detective, and loved the way this book explores Maisie’s personal struggles. (Also: such a great new setting.)

All Four Stars, Tara Dairman
Gladys Gatsby, age 11, harbors a secret passion for cooking – but her parents ban her from the kitchen after a small crème brûlée fire. Then an essay contest turns into a freelance restaurant-critic gig – only Gladys can’t tell her fast-food-loving parents. A fun, witty middle-grade novel with delicious food descriptions. Found at Bay Books in San Diego.

Death at Wentwater Court, Carola Dunn
The Honourable Daisy Dalrymple is thrilled to land a plum writing assignment for Town & Country, writing about posh Wentwater Court. But when one of her fellow house-party guests ends up dead, she gets drawn into the investigation. A fun 1920s British cozy mystery with a likable heroine. Found at Bay Books in San Diego.

Circling the Sun, Paula McLain
Raised on a horse farm in Kenya, Beryl Markham was fiercely unconventional – a half-wild girl who grew into a strong woman and a noted horse trainer and aviator. McLain brings Beryl and her world to life in this powerful novel. I loved McLain’s The Paris Wife, and I also read – and loved – Markham’s memoir, West with the Night, years ago. To review for Shelf Awareness (out July 28).

Links (not affiliate links) are to my favorite local bookstore, Brookline Booksmith.

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