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Posts Tagged ‘bookworm’

bloodline book christmas tree star wars

I am, as regular readers may know, a Star Wars fan. I say that cautiously, since I can’t even aspire to the highest levels of fandom in the Lucasfilm universe. (I thoroughly enjoyed The Last Jedi, by the way. I thought a few lines did not quite land, but I loved being back in that galaxy with a band of rebels old and new.)

I watch the original three films at least once a year. I quote them all the time: “Never tell me the odds!” And I’ve dressed up twice as Princess Leia: once in my teens for a midnight movie, once much more recently. (When my friend Nate turned 30 a few years ago, we all turned out in character to mark the occasion.)

Until this fall, though, I’d never read a Star Wars novel.

Why not? Call it confusion, or intimidation: there are dozens of novels, set in every conceivable niche of the Star Wars timeline and galaxy. Where to start? Add to that the thorny question of what’s considered “canon”: I’m not qualified to even touch that one.

But there’s a darker reason: my own literary snobbery.

Although I’m a lifelong bookworm with two literature degrees, I usually insist I’m not a book snob: I believe people should read what they love, be it a Pulitzer winner or the latest bestseller. But I secretly thought Star Wars novels had to be just cardboard imitations of the movies I loved.

Enter Claudia Gray’s novel Leia: Princess of Alderaan, which follows the young Leia as she takes a survival course and flies around the galaxy on missions of both humanitarian aid and espionage. It’s smart, fast-paced and full of the series’ signature wry humor. (Bonus: it introduces Amilyn Holdo, who appears as Vice Admiral Holdo in most of my favorite scenes in The Last Jedi.)

After devouring Princess of Alderaan, I picked up Bloodline (above), Gray’s 2016 novel recounting Leia’s political career in the New Republic (post-Return of the Jedi). I might have loved that one even more: Leia the senator is even more brave and badass (and a little wiser) than Leia the teenage rebel.

I doubt I’ll be diving into the whole Star Wars backlist any time soon. But it’s been a deep pleasure to read more of Leia’s story–and a reminder that, as Yoda says, sometimes we must unlearn what we have learned.

Have you read any Star Wars novels? Any recommendations for me?

Most of this column originally appeared in Shelf Awareness for Readers, where I’m part of the book review team.

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idlewild books nyc interior

As many of you know, I’m a regular contributor at Great New Books, where we take turns recommending (what else?) new books we love. Every December, we do a few group posts, in which we round up our favorite books of the year. (Because what’s better than one book rec? Ten book recs!)

becoming wise book sunflowers tea

Join us over at GNB to read about our favorite new books of 2016 (including mine, above); our favorite lines from books we read this year; and, today, the best books we finally got around to reading in 2016. (Keep an eye out for next week’s post – we’ll share the books we’re looking forward to reading in 2017.)

Happy reading and browsing – and feel free to share your favorites, either here or over at GNB.

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strand bookstore awning nyc

One of my favorite things about traveling alone: I can go to as many bookstores as I want. My husband is a patient man, but when we’re traveling together, he occasionally wants to see something other than the inside of a bookstore. (I can’t imagine why.)

On my solo trip to NYC in mid-August, I indulged my book-browsing habit to the tune of five bookstores in four days. I came home with a dozen new-to-me books (stuffed into the Strand tote bag I had prudently carried along), and a full bookworm heart.

three lives co bookstore nyc front

I stayed at the Larchmont Hotel in the West Village, so my first stop was Three Lives & Co., just a few blocks away. It’s a cozy, well-curated space with shelves that reach nearly to the ceiling.

three lives bookstore interior

I eavesdropped on a bookseller who was talking novels with a customer, and chimed in to second his recommendation of Where’d You Go, Bernadette. (My purchases: Robert MacFarlane’s Landmarks and Thomas Montasser’s charming novel A Very Special Year.)

Last time I visited Idlewild Books, they were in a second-floor storefront near Union Square, but they have moved to a spacious ground-floor shop in the West Village. I went in for a browse and picked up a quirky New England travel guide. The a/c was on the fritz and the box fans were blasting, but I loved nosing around the stacks and dreaming of trips I’d love to take.

idlewild books nyc interior

Up on Bleecker Street, also in the Village, bookbook provided another break from the heat and a fascinating place to browse. I picked up some good nonfiction at 50% off, including The Empathy Exams and H is for Hawk.

bookbook bookstore bleecker street west village nyc

I spent a good portion of my Sunday wandering the Upper West Side, and Book Culture on Columbus Ave. was a must. I love their huge ground floor full of gorgeous fiction, fascinating nonfiction and beautiful gifts, and their cozy children’s section in the basement is perfection. I came away with a whole stack: fiction, nonfiction and a couple of children’s books. And I loved this display toward the front of the store.

book culture women display

The Strand, with its 18 miles (!) of bookshelves, wasn’t far from my hotel, but I didn’t make it there until Sunday night – too busy wandering. I slipped in for a browse just before closing time and bought The Art of Slow Writing, which Addie had recommended. And then – because I could – I went back the next morning before my train left, and came away with a journal and a couple of gifts.

strand bookstore nyc exterior

I’m heading back to NYC later this fall, and a couple of these stores will definitely be on my list. If you’ve got other favorite NYC bookstores, let me know – I’m always looking for more bookish places to enjoy.

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everybody loves books sign

I get asked this question at least a couple of times a month: How do you find time to read so much?

I realize my book list is long even for an avowed bookworm – which I am. (Last year, introducing me at a staff retreat, my Boston-born supervisor summed me up this way: “This is Katie. She’s wicked smaahht and she reads a lot of books.”)

I’ve always been a voracious reader, but I’ve read even more than usual the past few years. So I thought I’d share the factors (and a few tips) that have helped make that happen.

First and foremost: I choose to read. That may sound obvious, but most of us have some measure of choice in our leisure activities, and reading is often the one I choose.

Second (and definitely related): I keep a lot of books around. I buy a fair amount of books, but I’m also an avid library user, and I always have several (piles) of books handy. This helps me sneak in a few pages over breakfast, before bed, or while I’m waiting for dinner to finish cooking. And I always have at least one (usually more) books in my bag when I’m out and about.

Third: I’m a fast reader. I don’t speed read; I don’t (usually) skim; I just read quickly. I always have. I realize this isn’t a helpful tip, or something you can change (past a certain point) – but it does help me read a lot. (Anne touched on this recently when she talked about unfair advantages.)

Fourth: I’m always reading several books at once. These are often different genres, but usually include fiction and nonfiction. Sometimes it’s “challenging” fiction plus a middlebrow mystery or young adult novel.

Related: I often tackle classics or stimulating nonfiction earlier in the day, when my brain is fresh. Currently, I’m reading a few pages of Middlemarch over breakfast most mornings. And I love to unwind with something gentle before bed.

Fifth: I have built-in reading time – on the subway. It takes about 45 minutes to get from my house to Harvard Square, and while I sometimes pull out my smartphone and surf around online, I spend most of that time reading. (This is another argument for carrying more than one book in my bag; some days I spend a lot of time on the train!)

Sixth: I read a few “assigned” books for review each month. My review gig for Shelf Awareness means I get a stack of new books every month for review. I get to choose which ones I review, which means I don’t have to slog through a book I’m not enjoying for the Shelf. This is liberating, and helps mitigate the overwhelm. And those review deadlines are great motivators.

Seventh: I’m always hearing about great new books, thanks to several sources. These include the eponymous site where I’m part of the review team; both versions of Shelf Awareness, which I read avidly as well as contributing to; and the plethora of bookish folks in my Twitter feed and blogroll. I think it’s crucial to be excited about what you’re reading, and these sites and people help keep my to-be-read list fresh (and long).

Do you build in reading time, or read more than one book at once? Any other tips for squeezing in more reading time? Or any great book recs? I’m always looking for those.

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