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Posts Tagged ‘chick flicks’

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August was a whirlwind, and I capped it off with a quick solo trip to NYC. Between working, running and settling into my new place, here’s what I have been reading:

City of Girls, Elizabeth Gilbert
Vassar dropout Vivian Morris moves to Manhattan to live with her eccentric Aunt Peg, who runs a down-at-heel theatre company. Amid the glitz and heartbreak of the city, Vivian and her compatriots find, lose and reinvent themselves many times over. This novel is a champagne cocktail with some unexpected depth (and occasional bite). I loved Vivian (much more once she gained a little self-awareness) and the theatre crew, especially Peg and Olive, her stalwart secretary-general. So much fun.

Celine, Peter Heller
Private eye Celine Watkins is handed an intriguing cold case: that of a National Geographic photographer who disappeared in a national park years ago. She and her husband, Pete, take off in her son’s camper van to figure out what became of Paul Lamont. Witty and well plotted, with wonderful characters; I’d read a whole series about Celine. Recommended by Anne and Jaclyn.

Good Husbandry: Growing Food, Love and Family on Essex Farm, Kristin Kimball
I loved Kimball’s first memoir, The Dirty Life, about how she met and started a farm with her husband, Mark (entirely contrary to her former life plan). This, her second, digs deeper (ha) into their years of working the farm and making it sustainable in various ways (physical, financial, etc.). I love her warm honesty, her crisp, vivid prose, and the way she weaves together the day-to-day of farm life with the big questions of love, work, parenting and identity. To review for Shelf Awareness (out Oct. 15).

Waiting for Tom Hanks, Kerry Winfrey
Aspiring screenwriter Annie Cassidy is waiting: for her hair to calm down, for her life to improve, for her perfect rom-com hero (a la ’90s Tom Hanks) to materialize. But when she gets an assistant job on a movie set, the guy she meets isn’t quite what she expected (and neither is anyone else). Sweet, fast and funny; perfect weekend reading. Recommended by Anne.

Why Can’t I Be You, Allie Larkin
Jenny Shaw gets dumped on her way to a business conference – then gets mistaken for a stranger in the hotel lobby of said conference. Before she knows it, she’s swept up in pretending to be Jessie Morgan, attending her high school reunion and finding real connection with Jessie’s friends. But of course, the illusion can’t last. This one was equal parts fun and cringe-y for me, though I loved the supporting cast.

Mudlark: In Search of London’s Past Along the River Thames, Lara Meiklem
The River Thames has long been a repository for lost things, accidentally or on purpose. Meiklem is a veteran “mudlark”–a scavenger who’s fascinated by the river’s trash and treasure. Her book charts her own journeys on the Thames foreshore, the objects she finds and their histories, and so much fascinating backstory about the river, the city and its people. To review for Shelf Awareness (out Nov. 5).

Most links (not affiliate links) are to my favorite local bookstore, Brookline Booksmith.

What are you reading?

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(Image via PopSugar)

My family has a deep love for 1990s romantic comedies – from While You Were Sleeping to French Kiss to the Nora Ephron classics. When my sister was unpacking my DVDs recently, she exclaimed, “You have all the good ones!”

One of my faves in this category is Runaway Bride, which I love for its brilliant supporting cast (including Rita Wilson and Hector Elizondo); its quirky small-town details (a hair salon called Curl Up & Dye!), and its best friend, the salon owner, played by Joan Cusack. (“Peggy Flemming–not the ice skater.”)

At one point in the film, Peggy and Maggie (Cusack and Roberts) are at the town softball game when Maggie spots Ike (Gere’s journalist character) approaching. “I will handle this,” Peggy says, in true best-friend fashion. Maggie snaps: “Don’t move your lips!” (They’ve already figured Ike can probably read lips.)

“I will handle this!” Peggy exclaims, through clenched teeth. “I won’t say anything.”

Lately, this is how I often feel. Whether it’s setting up utilities or hanging pictures, writing book reviews or sorting out divorce paperwork, I find myself thinking, “I will handle this!” while worrying I’m not handling it at all.

To be clear, I’ve had lots of help: my mom, my sister, several stalwart friends. But a lot of these responsibilities fall solely to me, and that can be exhausting. And the never-ending list(s) of tasks can make me feel like I’m failing at all of it.

And yet: my little apartment, full of light and books and my favorite things, is coming together. The book reviews are (mostly) getting turned in (relatively) on time. I have gas and electricity and enough food to eat. And not every decision has to be made today.

“There is nothing you’re not handling,” my therapist said the other day, her gentle eyes full of kindness, as they always are. In the midst of such massive transition, it’s worth cultivating a little self-compassion – or, sometimes, channeling my inner Peggy Flemming. (Not the ice skater.)

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72nd broadway nyc

Recently, I took off to New York City for three days by myself. My husband was headed to a conference in Texas, and I needed a change of scenery – which New York always provides.

I’ve been to New York several times before, to visit Allison when she lived in Queens or for long weekends with J. But I’d never taken an entirely solo trip there, and I had never stayed in Manhattan. So I took advantage of this trip to rent an apartment on the Upper West Side, and spend three days pretending I was Kathleen Kelly.

silver flats striped skirt

I have a longstanding love affair with You’ve Got Mail – my favorite Nora Ephron film, and one of my favorite movies ever. I love everything about it: the witty dialogue, the gorgeous neighborhood, the whimsical soundtrack, the charming Shop Around the Corner. I love the minor characters: sweet Christina, clueless George, quippy Kevin, wise Birdie. Most of all I love Kathleen Kelly herself: brave, quirky, thoughtful, utterly human.

Although I’d visited a few You’ve Got Mail spots on previous trips to New York, I took the time to visit them all – and linger – this time around. On my first afternoon in the city, I walked down to Riverside Park.

riverside park benches

“There’s a place in Riverside Park at 91st Street where the path curves and there’s a garden,” Joe writes to Kathleen in his last email. “Brinkley and I will be waiting.”

91 street garden riverside park nyc

The 91st Street Garden is lush with late-summer flowers right now, and though I didn’t see Brinkley and Joe, I saw plenty of dogs and their owners (as well as runners, cyclists and nannies with strollers).

91st street garden fence nyc

Cafe Lalo, scene of the famous book-and-a-rose encounter in the movie, is on West 83rd Street, just a few blocks from where I was staying. I’d been there for dessert once before, but on this trip I went for breakfast every morning.

cafe lalo table berries teacup

Delicious pastries (croissants and pain au chocolat), fresh berries, cheery yellow mugs. There’s a whole wall of French windows, and fresh flowers on all the tables. Every time I walked up, I couldn’t help but smile, thinking of Joe Fox: “She had to be! She had to be!”

Zabar’s, the famous deli, also appears in the movie, and I popped in to browse the displays of gourmet treats and buy some Earl Grey. I also grabbed a hot dog at Gray’s Papaya, and spotted a eucalyptus candle at a housewares shop on Broadway. (As George knows, they make an apartment smell “mossy.”)

eucalyptus candle

I didn’t find the Shop Around the Corner, of course, but I did stumble onto Book Culture‘s newest location. The children’s section, in the basement, is a wonderland, and the entire store is enchanting.

book culture childrens department

Mostly, I spent hours wandering the West Side, stopping often to snap photos of beautiful brownstones and light through the trees.

upper west side brownstones nyc

On my last morning in the city, I bought a chai latte and wandered back to Riverside Park, under a bold blue sky. I could almost hear the Cranberries playing as I walked down West 86th, toward the park.

upper west side view

(Then I slipped and fell on some stairs and spilled my chai everywhere, proving that my life is not a romantic comedy after all. But at least it makes for a good story.)

I relish the love story in You’ve Got Mail, of course, but more and more I also appreciate its other main plot thread: an unexpected career turn and what happens afterward. That storyline doesn’t resolve neatly, but that, too, rings true – many careers are not a straight line, and most of us have a few bumps we didn’t choose along the way. I like to imagine that Kathleen found happiness in another book-related career, even as she found personal happiness with Joe Fox.

I had other adventures in New York – including visits to several (more) bookstores, of which more soon. But for now, I’ll leave with you with a few daisies from Central Park – because, after all, they are the friendliest flower.

central park yellow flowers nyc

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Because I love chick flicks, especially romantic comedies, and I know some of you do too. And because “comfort movies” are the BEST when life is crazy and transition is tilting every which way. In no particular order except for #1. (Note: I chose not to list any musicals, or vintage films…maybe those will be their own lists later on.)

1. You’ve Got Mail. I love everything about this film – Kathleen Kelly, her bookstore, her friends, the adorable emails, the soundtrack, Joe Fox’s gradual transformation. And SO MANY lines. “Patricia makes coffee nervous.” “Don’t you think daisies are the friendliest flower?” “I would send you a bouquet of newly sharpened pencils if I knew your name and address.” “I wanted it to be you so badly.”

2. While You Were Sleeping. This is a favorite from long ago – I love the crazy, quirky family and the hilarious misunderstandings. (The little grandma is my favorite.) The family scenes are the best. “Cesar Romero was not Spanish.” “I didn’t say he was Spanish; I said he was tall.” “John Wayne was tall!” “These mashed potatoes are so creamy.” And on and on…

3. Sabrina. I actually like the remake better than the original…Harrison Ford is just so much more attractive than Humphrey Bogart. And Julia Ormond is perfect…and because of my love for Oxford I know exactly how she feels about Paris.

4. Runaway Bride. I love Julia Roberts’ laugh; I love Richard Gere’s twinkling eyes; I love the ongoing conversation about eggs and the quirky grandmother and the soundtrack. And I love that of all her grooms, Richard Gere is the only man who runs after her.

5. French Kiss. Oh, how we love Meg Ryan in my family, and oh, how we shriek with laughter at Kevin Kline’s French accent and Meg’s rumpled, wide-eyed, overwhelmed character in this movie. Brilliant.

6. The Holiday. I love everything about this movie, from the English cottage setting to Jack Black’s sassy eyebrows to Eli Wallach’s brilliant turn as an old Hollywood screenwriter. And the lines…the lines! “I also wrote one that sounds like you. I used only the good notes.” Wonderful.

7. 27 Dresses. I sympathize with put-together Jane, but I love her wacky best friend Casey…and I love how this movie is funny and frothy, but also deep.

8. The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants. What a gorgeous movie…beautifully shot and put together…and again, a great adaptation of a favorite story. I think the four girls were cast perfectly, especially Bridget.

9. Sleepless in Seattle. I laugh and cry every. single. time. Especially at the end. “Shall we?”

Clearly, looking at this list, I love smart, sassy women and happy endings. There are lots of other chick flicks (comedies and dramas) I really like: both Father of the Bride films, Serendipity, Mona Lisa Smile, Miss Congeniality, Music and Lyrics, Notting Hill, The Devil Wears Prada, The Princess Diaries, both versions of Pride and Prejudice, Becoming Jane, Chocolat, Julie and Julia, many movie musicals…I could go on and on. But these are the ones I watch over and over again, the ones I actually own (most of them), the ones I reach for when I really need something cozy and familiar, funny and heartwarming.

What are your faves? (If you’re a guy, you can roll your eyes now.) But seriously…I love chick flicks because they embody so much of what we (at least women) want out of life: good friends, real love and (usually) happy endings. I’d love to hear your thoughts.

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