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Posts Tagged ‘dogs’

Katie silhouette trail river blue sky

I used to see her in the neighborhood all the time, on the river trail where I ran, or standing on the sidewalk by her house, chatting up a storm with Sharon or Claire or one of the other neighbor women. Her dog, Riley, a beautiful red golden retriever with a few years on her, was nearly always in attendance.

Riley was used to being showered with affection by pretty much everyone in the neighborhood. She’d walk right up and sit on my feet while Kenzie and I chatted a minute, nudging my hand to keep scratching her silky ears if I got too distracted by our conversation. There was a man who lived down the street – Paul or Joe or Mike, one of those monosyllabic Boston Irish names – who referred to her as The Great Riley. He always remembered my name because he had a sister named Katie, the only girl in a family of five or six brothers. 

Kenzie lived in the yellow house on the corner, which was her dad’s house until they bought it from him about ten years ago, she and her husband Frank, whom I’d regularly see on the trail too. He’d either be striding along, deep in thought, or sitting on one of the rough granite benches, watching birds fly over the marsh with his binoculars. I never saw him smile, but once or twice in December I caught sight of him wearing a Santa hat, which was at odds with his expression but fit perfectly with his long white beard and hair. 

Kenzie was kind and inquisitive and funny, a retired nurse with a daughter in her twenties and a stepson whom I never saw. She was the first neighbor I ever made friends with, after seven years in Boston and three different apartments, not for lack of trying. I was charmed by her open, easy manner and the New England accent you could have cut with a steak knife. I never even knew her last name, but we were friends, of a sort, and I was always genuinely glad to see her.

I haven’t been down to the old neighborhood in a year or more, not since I separated from my husband and moved across the city. I told Kenzie I was getting divorced the week before I moved out. “Put your phone number in my mailbox,” she said. “We’ll go for a drink sometime.” I wanted to, and I meant to, but I never did. Somehow it was easier to leave a few of those loose ends of my old life untied. 

It’s October again, and the air turns sharp as the sky changes from cobalt to serge blue to golden in the evenings. I think of the waving reeds on the trail, and the murmuring sound they made. Sometimes I think of Riley, gone now, and wonder if Kenzie has gotten a new dog. I hope she has. Our friendship was brief, but it sustained me, made me feel like I belonged in that pocket of Dorchester, between the old chocolate factory and the river, in the third-floor apartment that was home for a while.

I wrote most of this post as an exercise for a writing class I’m taking online through ModernWell this fall. Since it’s sort of running-related, my fellow group members suggested I share it with you.

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june-book-stack

We’re halfway through June, somehow – and what a ride it has been. Here’s what I have been reading:

The Last Stargazers: The Enduring Story of Astronomy’s Vanishing Explorers, Emily Levesque
Most people imagine astronomers gazing into a backyard telescope, discovering new stars or trying to make contact with aliens. The reality is a little different, and Levesque’s memoir tells that story with humor and heart. She traces her own journey from backyard stargazer to Ph.D.-holding astronomer, and gives readers a tour of some of the world’s most powerful telescopes. Plenty of fun anecdotes about her colleagues and the field, too. To review for Shelf Awareness (out Aug. 4).

Song of the Trees, Mildred D. Taylor
I love Taylor’s series about the Logan family. This novella, narrated by Cassie, tells the story of a white landowner threatening to cut down some of the trees on her family’s land. Short and powerful.

Black History in Its Own Words, Ronald Wimberly
My guy gave me this book a while back – a collection of powerful quotes and portraits of black leaders, past and present. Some were familiar to me (bell hooks, Nina Simone, Muhammad Ali), others less so (Kimberly Bryant, Emory Douglas). Made me want to learn more about all of them.

The City Baker’s Guide to Country Living, Louise Miller
I needed a cozy, familiar story, so I picked up my friend Louise’s lovely debut novel. Boston baker Olivia Rawlings escapes to Vermont after setting her workplace (literally) on fire. Once there, she finds herself with a baking job, some new friends and a possible love interest. I love Livvy’s story and its warm, good-hearted cast of characters.

The Nesting Dolls, Alina Adams
Spanning eight decades, from Siberian work camps to 1970s Odessa to present-day Brighton Beach, Brooklyn, Adam’s saga follows three protagonists in the same Soviet family: Daria, her granddaughter Natasha, and Natasha’s granddaughter Zoe. It’s a compelling look at how the Soviet state’s ideas affected every aspect of its citizens’ lives, but it’s also a really good family saga – so good I flew through it, even on the Kindle. To review for Shelf Awareness (out July 14).

I Think You’re Wrong (But I’m Listening): A Guide to Grace-Filled Political Conversations, Sarah Stewart Holland and Beth Silvers
We are living in polarized times – and it can feel difficult and daunting to have conversations with people who think/vote/believe differently than we do. Sarah and Beth, hosts of the Pantsuit Politics podcast, share what they’ve learned through several years of digging into the issues together, and trying to do it with humility, curiosity and grace. So thoughtful and thought-provoking. Highly recommended.

The Scent of Murder, Kylie Logan
School admin assistant Jazz Ramsey spends her spare time training cadaver dogs. But she’s not prepared to find a body one Saturday night – much less one that belongs to a former student Jazz knew. Troubled by Florie Allen’s death, Jazz searches for answers while dealing (or choosing not to deal) with her personal life, including her detective ex-boyfriend. A solid entry in a new mystery series.

Silver Sparrow, Tayari Jones
Jones’ breakout novel tells the story of two girls who share a father, but only one of them knows it. In 1980s Atlanta, Dana and Chaurisse navigate both their teenage years and the complications of their family’s story. I loved (and was stunned by) Jones’ An American Marriage, and am glad I finally read this one.

Lumberjanes, Vol. 1: Beware the Kitten Holy, Noelle Stevenson, Shannon Watters, Brooke A. Allen, Grace Ellis
Jaclyn sent me the first two volumes of this highly entertaining comic, which follows five friends at an unconventional summer camp. I loved their exclamations (“Holy Mae Jemison!”) and the ways they band together. Lots of setup in this volume for whatever is coming next. So much fun.

The Late Bloomers’ Club, Louise Miller
Nora Huckleberry is mostly content running the town diner in Guthrie, Vermont. But when she and her free-spirited sister inherit some land from an acquaintance, Nora’s life suddenly gets complicated. Miller’s second novel features some familiar faces and lots of new ones, and a protagonist wrestling with big life questions. Full of charm and heart.

Keep It Moving: Lessons for the Rest of Your Life, Twyla Tharp
Anne recommended this follow-up to Tharp’s The Creative Habit, which I loved. Tharp, a world-renowned dancer and choreographer, gives practical advice for building stamina and maintaining creativity and vitality as you age. She’s no-nonsense and wise, and this was a worthwhile read.

Spiderweb for Two, Elizabeth Enright
Randy and Oliver, the two youngest Melendys, are lonely without their older siblings. But a mysterious scavenger hunt fills their winter with adventures. I like the Melendys best when they are all together, but this final book in the quartet is charming and fun.

Most links (not affiliate links) are to my favorite local bookstores, Brookline Booksmith and Trident. I’ve also linked to Frugal Bookstore, a black-owned bookstore here in Boston. Y’all know I love independent bookstores, and I am also trying to support black-owned businesses more often as part of my commitment to anti-racist work.

What are you reading?

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book-knitting-muffin

I’ve blown through half a dozen books recently – which feels good after a stretch of not reading quite as much. Here’s what I have been reading lately:

Heart of Barkness, Spencer Quinn
Chet the dog and his pal Bernie Little, P.I., are back. Their ninth adventure finds them investigating a couple of suspicious deaths involving an elderly country singer. It was slow to start, but I love Chet’s entertaining narrative voice, and the mystery plot was satisfying.

The Bookshop on the Shore, Jenny Colgan
Single mother Zoe is desperate to get out of London, and when she lands two part-time gigs in Scotland, it seems like a good idea. I like Colgan’s fiction and this had more depth than usual, with the motherless children Zoe cares for and the challenges facing her young son. Nina (from The Bookshop on the Corner) features too, but I grew irritated with her. I gobbled this up in two days.

Death in a Desert Land, Andrew Wilson
After her divorce, Agatha Christie heads to Baghdad and Ur to visit an archaeological dig and do some spying for the British government. But she soon finds herself investigating a murder. Wilson’s third mystery featuring Christie as amateur detective (the first one I’ve read) was fast-paced (after a slow start) and engaging.

The Vanderbeekers to the Rescue, Karina Yan Glaser
The five Vanderbeeker kids have all kinds of plans for spring break – which do not include accidentally ruining their mother’s baking business. But they band together to outwit a grumpy inspector, build a tree house and deal with mysterious pets (chickens!) guinea pigs!) that keep appearing on their doorstep. I love this middle-grade series and this third entry was so much fun.

Land’s End: A Walk in Provincetown, Michael Cunningham
Set at the very end of Cape Cod, Provincetown has a unique character and mythology. I have several friends who love it there, and Cunningham’s memoir/history is evocative, fascinating and melancholy. I found this at Three Lives in NYC; the manager, whose taste I trust, waxed lyrical about it. Lovely.

How to Love a Country, Richard Blanco
Blanco, who served as President Obama’s inaugural poet, is back with a fierce, vivid, haunting collection exploring what it is to be an immigrant, to live between two worlds, to be gay in this country, to mourn various national tragedies (the Pulse shooting, the Boston Marathon bombings). These poems pull no punches and they’re also beautiful.

A Dangerous Engagement, Ashley Weaver
Amory Ames and her husband, Milo, sail to New York for the wedding of Amory’s childhood friend. But when one of the groomsmen is found murdered, Amory and Milo begin investigating. I love this stylish, well-plotted mystery series and this was a delightful entry.

Most links (not affiliate links) are to my favorite local bookstore, Brookline Booksmith.

What are you reading?

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phoenix dog sidewalk

Fall has come to Boston, and I’m dog-sitting again for my friend Carolyn, who is now also my neighbor. I spent several weeks at her house this spring, taking care of Phoenix the golden doodle pup, and I’m happily spending the second half of September hanging out with him again.

The alarm goes off in the morning, and I stretch and hit snooze and turn to look out the windows at the park, where the leaves are just starting to turn. As soon as my feet hit the floor, Phoenix starts scratching at the door of his crate: if I’m up, he wants to be up. But when I get out of the shower, I usually find him curled up on the bed, often next to my pillow. Sometimes he’ll wave a paw, asking for some extra pets or snuggles, and I usually comply. (He knows I’m a softie.)

I get dressed, blow-dry my hair, grab a banana for me and some treats for Phoenix, and clip his red leash to his collar. We head downstairs and out the door, taking the same route most mornings: down the street, around the corner and back up the hill.

Sometimes we run into a friend, or a small child excited to see a doggie. Sometimes we both stop to smell the flowers (though Phoenix also likes to smell everything else). He trots along happily, plumy tail waving, and does his business, and I give him treats and take deep breaths of fresh air. I drop him back off at home, feed him breakfast, and head to the train to go to work.

It’s a simple morning ritual, and I love it: scratching him behind the ears as he wanders around the bedroom, watching him wag frantically at other pups, giving him those extra cuddles, stretching our legs together. His little joyful presence is good medicine, these days. And I’m grateful.

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gold-red-lily

It’s August, somehow, and I’m in full summer mode: iced chai, tan lines and freckles (and lots of sunscreen), stovetop cooking (when I cook anything), and all the berries I can eat. Here’s what’s saving my life, in these hot, hazy, still-transition-filled days:

  • Late-summer flowers: black-eyed Susans, deep blue and pink hydrangeas, the first dahlias, day lilies in every shade of yellow and red and orange.
  • Running into Phoenix, my little golden doodle buddy, and his person on my morning walks.
  • My friend Jen Lee’s brand-new, free YouTube video series: Morning, Sunshine. Go check it out if you’d like a dose of connection and compassion.

boston-harbor-view

  • The views out my new apartment windows: Boston Harbor on one side, the local park (usually with a friendly dog or two) on the other side.
  • My Rothys, which I’m wearing all. the. time. 
  • The silver triangle Zil earrings I bought at the SoWa market last month.
  • Texts from friends checking in on my move and transition.

iced-chai-blue-bikes

  • Iced chai – from Darwin’s when I can make it to the Square, and from the BPL or Tatte when I can’t.
  • Ginger peach MEM tea in my favorite purple travel mug, every morning.
  • Susannah Conway’s August Break photo project.
  • My favorite LUSH face mask – it’s Cookie-Monster blue and smells like citrus.

frame-up-book

  • Impulse grabs from the BPL’s new books shelf, and piles of ARCs for Shelf Awareness.
  • Morning Bluebike rides across the river.
  • Rosé and raspberry-lemon sorbet after a long evening of unpacking.
  • Eating my breakfast granola out of a real bowl.
  • Trader Joe’s veggie beet wraps, berries and cherries, yogurt, granola, hint-of-lime tortilla chips and sourdough bread. (Not all at once.)

hot-chocolate-woodcut-journal

  • Bryan Nash Gill’s “Woodcut” journals – I bought a four-pack at Trident a while ago. And good pens.
  • Colleagues who make me laugh.
  • Listening to some of the artists I heard/discovered at the Newport Folk Festival – about which more soon.
  • Having enough brain space (finally!) to make this list.

What’s saving your life these days, my friends?

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Williamsburg bridge

I started a new job last week, about which more soon. But before that: one last summer weekend adventure.

My friend Kirsten was house- and dog-sitting for a friend in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, and she invited me to come down for a weekend. I thought: This could be either totally crazy or just what I need.

Well, it was both. But mostly just what I needed.

I took the train down on a Friday morning and, on arrival, headed straight for the West Village. It was swampy hot outside, but iced hibiscus tea and avocado toast at Bluestone Lane went a long way toward cooling me down.

avocado toast iced tea nbc

I spent a while wandering my favorite tangle of streets, browsing Pink Olive and popping into Three Lives for some poetry and bookseller gossip. Then I headed to Astoria for iced tea with Carlee, a friend from Abilene who just moved to the city for grad school. We talked as fast as we could. It was lovely to be together.

Eventually, I made it over to Williamsburg, and Kirsten and I spent the evening wandering and talking, mostly in the company of this lovely canine.

stick dog puppy

This is Stick, and she’s a sweetheart. Aside from trying to lick us to death (which I didn’t mind terribly), she was a wonderful weekend companion. We took several long walks around the neighborhood, and she hopped up on the bed for some snuggles in the early mornings.

We enjoyed Greek food and cocktails at Ela Taverna on Friday night, and walked home through a light, cool rain.

The next morning, Stick and I walked to the nearby park and stumbled onto a farmers’ market. I bought a pastry and some blackberries, and we swung by The Bean (dog friendly!) for chai on the way back. Later on, Kirsten and I grabbed brunch at Allswell in the neighborhood.

k&k brunch allswell Williamsburg

Saturdays are perfect for wandering, and that’s what we did: up and down the neighborhood streets, into and out of funky shops, over to Domino Park with its views of Manhattan and city residents playing volleyball and soaking up the sunshine.

That evening found us grabbing a bite and heading up to Times Square to see Carousel, which was gorgeous and sad. I wasn’t familiar with the story and found it a bit convoluted, to be honest. But the dancing was beautiful, the set was exquisite and Broadway is always magical. We got ice cream afterward, and dragged our tired selves back to Brooklyn.

carousel broadway marquee sign

I had to head home on Sunday, but we did enjoy an early light lunch at a cafe before I hopped on the subway. In addition to all the wandering, we spent hours talking about work and family and life. It was a series of new adventures in a city I know and love: perfect for a weekend that served as a hinge between old and new. And, of course, the puppy snuggles didn’t hurt.

Katie stick dog heart Brooklyn

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tulips candle dog table

If you know me in real life, you might know that I have a thing for dachshunds. (I could not resist that dachshund creamer, above, at Fish’s Eddy in NYC last fall.) My family had two dachshunds when I was growing up: Molly, a black-and-gray dapple with a fondness for long naps, and later Peanut, a black mini dachshund who wanted to play all day long.

Both of those sweet dogs are long gone now, and we can’t have a dog in our current apartment. But lately I’m getting my dachshund cuteness fix through Instagram.

It started with Mary Todd Lincoln, a tiny dappled dachshund (with amazingly fuzzy ears) who is one of the resident shop dogs at Parnassus Books (Ann Patchett’s bookstore) in Nashville.

View this post on Instagram

Sunday funday. #marytoddlincoln #FLOTUS #dachshundappreciation

A post shared by Mary Todd Lincoln (@marytoddlincolncoffman) on

 

I mean. Is she not completely adorable? She also likes to accessorize – or tolerates her humans’ tendency to accessorize her.

 

 

The second account I’m obsessed with is Harlow and Sage – which these days actually means Harlow, a Weimaraner with the funniest facial expressions, and Indiana and Reese, her dachshund pals.

 

https://www.instagram.com/p/BB2p0ZQrP_w/?taken-by=harlowandsage

 

They are seriously silly, and seriously cute.

 

 

The third account I love is Riley the Dachshund. Riley is a tiny black mini dachshund (I swear he looks just like Peanut) who was adopted via the Puppy Bowl.

 

View this post on Instagram

Hi! Play with me?

A post shared by Riley The Dachshund (@rileythedoxie) on

 

My husband rolls his eyes sometimes when I have to show him all the cute dachshund photos at the end of the day. But they make me so happy.

Any animals you’re obsessed with on Instagram or other social media? (What a strange world we live in.)

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August reading roundup #3

bookstore gloucester ma

(Interior shot of The Bookstore of Gloucester, MA)

The Prince of Los Cocuyos: A Miami Childhood, Richard Blanco
I love Blanco’s 2012 inaugural poem and was swept up by this colorful memoir of his Cuban-American childhood in Miami. Full of vividly drawn characters (his family and friends) and poignant reflections on being caught between two cultures. To review for Shelf Awareness (out Sept. 30).

The Mountaintop School for Dogs and Other Second Chances, Ellen Cooney
Evie, age 24 and a total mess, applies to be a trainer at a remote, highly unusual school for rescue dogs. Spare, quiet and moving, though I felt it ended too abruptly.

Mrs. Pollifax Unveiled, Dorothy Gilman
Mrs. Pollifax‘s 14th (and final) adventure finds her headed to Syria (with her friend John Sebastian Farrell) in search of a missing American girl. An entertaining adventure, and Mrs. P saves the day as always. I’m sad to have finished this enjoyable series.

The Pink Suit, Nicole Mary Kelby
I devoured this fictional imagining of the story behind Jacqueline Kennedy’s iconic pink suit. Kate, the Irish seamstress who works on the suit, was a wonderful character, and the language is gorgeous. Absorbing and evocative.

The Language of Flowers, Vanessa Diffenbaugh
Victoria Jones has grown up in the foster care system, becoming hardened and cynical – except for her secret love of the Victorian language of flowers. Fascinating characters, beautiful writing and a heartbreaking but hopeful story.

The Counterfeit Heiress, Tasha Alexander
A murder at a masquerade ball leads to a peculiar missing-persons case – but well-bred sleuth Lady Emily and her dashing husband are up to the task. Witty and well plotted. Ninth in a series, but the first one I’ve read. To review for Shelf Awareness (out Oct. 14).

Links (not affiliate links) are to my favorite local bookstore, Brookline Booksmith.

What are you reading?

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June reading roundup #1

june books 1

Looking for Me, Beth Hoffman
Teddi Overman has built a successful antiques business in Charleston. But her heart is still tied to the family farm in Kentucky, where her brother Josh disappeared years ago. Hoffman tells Teddi’s and Josh’s stories through a series of flashbacks, exploring their family’s tight but difficult bond. The flashbacks confused me at times, but I enjoyed the descriptions of Charleston and the farm, and the cast of distinctly Southern characters, especially Teddi’s best friend Olivia. (I loved Hoffman’s debut, Saving CeeCee Honeycutt.)

Changing My Mind: Occasional Essays, Zadie Smith
This collection includes incisive literary criticism, wry film reviews, a paean to Katharine Hepburn and notes from both a family Christmas and a week in Liberia. Smith is witty, wide-ranging and smart. I skimmed a couple of essays whose subject matter was unfamiliar or uninteresting to me, but found most of them insightful and enjoyable.

The End of Your Life Book Club, Will Schwalbe
This memoir started slowly, but once I got hooked, I couldn’t put it down. Schwalbe recounts his mother’s two-year battle with cancer, during which he and she created an informal, two-member book club and discussed books of all stripes. There is some necessary eulogizing (and she does seem like an admirable person), but I loved Schwalbe’s reflections on how great books can shape our lives and give us a way to talk to one another. Wonderful.

The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie, Muriel Spark
I picked this up on a whim at Raven Used Books. Miss Jean Brodie is a “progressive” teacher at a staid Edinburgh school, who hand-selects a few girls to be her “crème de la crème.” They learn various unconventional lessons from her. An interesting premise, but I found Miss Brodie egomanaical and the girls cardboard cutouts. This one didn’t work for me.

E.B. White on Dogs, E.B. White, ed. Martha White
I found this collection at The Bookstore in Lenox, during our Berkshires trip. I’ve already read many of the pieces that appear in White’s letters and essay collections. They are fun to revisit, though, and this book includes a few new gems (plus several pieces that only mention dogs tangentially). White and I both love dogs in general and dachshunds in particular. And as always, he is a sharp-eyed, good noticer.

The Runaway Princess, Hester Browne
Garden designer Amy Wilde has pretty much given up on men – until she meets a handsome, kind one who turns out to be a real-life prince. Leo dazzles Amy with his thoughtfulness and charm, but her shyness plus a family secret may prevent her from embracing the royal lifestyle. A witty, enchanting modern fairy tale – I loved Amy, Leo, and Amy’s hilarious (and resourceful) flatmate, Jo. So much fun.

This post contains IndieBound affiliate links.

What are you reading?

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china cabinet bookcase books

My china-cabinet bookcase

Thereby Hangs a Tail, Spencer Quinn
Chet and Bernie (a canine-human PI pair) handle a missing-persons case with a twist: the real target, also missing, is Princess, a tiny but famous show dog. Tracking down Princess and her owner proves complicated, especially when Bernie’s girlfriend, Suzie, also disappears. Chet makes a few discoveries on his own, but he can’t share them in words, and it takes a few more days (and Bernie’s interviewing skills) to put the pieces together. Just as fun as Dog On It, with lots of sharp observations and canine asides from Chet.

Shall We Play That One Together? The Life and Art of Jazz Piano Legend Marian McPartland, Paul de Barros
Born in England and trained as a classical pianist, Marian McPartland became one of the top jazz pianists in the U.S. Paul de Barros tells her story, from her childhood to her experiences playing with the USO during World War II (where she met her husband, cornetist Jimmy McPartland) to the decades she spent in the States, playing, touring and composing. Thorough and fascinating (though the names of jazz pieces and players are dizzying, at times). Recommended for fans of jazz, meaty biographies and American pop music. To review for Shelf Awareness (out Oct. 16).

To Fetch a Thief, Spencer Quinn
Chet and Bernie’s third case involves a missing circus elephant and her trainer, with an interesting subplot concerning a divorce case. Quinn ratchets up the action in this book, taking our heroes south of the border in pursuit of animal traffickers. Chet’s perspective on the various circus folk is highly entertaining, as are his interactions with Peanut. Even better than the first two books.

The Christmas Plains, Joseph Bottum
Bottum recalls his childhood Christmases in the Midwest, mixing in carols, Charles Dickens, musings on holiday  commercialism and traditions, and stories from other times in his life. He rambles at times, but also hits on a few profound truths about this much-loved, much-maligned holiday. (It felt odd to read this in August, but I was reading for Shelf Awareness; the book is out Oct. 23.)

The Dog Who Knew Too Much, Spencer Quinn
Chet and Bernie return for a fourth case, tracking down a boy missing from a wilderness camp. When someone else from the camp turns up dead and Bernie gets arrested for murder, it’s up to Chet to bring in reinforcements (even if that means a few long nights on the road) and crack the case. Suspenseful, well plotted, funny and satisfying – these books get better and better.

Leave Me Alone, I’m Reading: Finding and Losing Myself in Books, Maureen Corrigan
Corrigan, the book critic for NPR’s Fresh Air, explores the joys of a reading life, focusing on three genres and how they’ve shaped her own perspective: female extreme adventure stories (a genre she names and explains), detective fiction, and Catholic memoirs/fiction. I love books about books, and I enjoyed her smart musings and vivid anecdotes. (Also: her tales of graduate school convinced me anew that I am not meant to get a Ph.D.) Good fun if you’re a reader.

A Dance with Jane Austen: How a Novelist and her Characters Went to the Ball, Susannah Fullerton
Fullerton explains dance in Jane Austen’s day, from etiquette to menus to dress, accompanied by lovely period illustrations. She also discusses dancing and balls in each of Austen’s novels, exploring how they move the action forward and what they tell us about the characters. (She draws rather heavily on the unfinished The Watsons, but Pride and Prejudice, Emma and Mansfield Park get plenty of play.) Fun and informative; a good bet for Austen fans. To review for Shelf Awareness (out Oct. 16).

This post contains IndieBound affiliate links.

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