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Posts Tagged ‘grocery shopping’

After a year, they know me there: the brunette in the green coat who loves Gamal. I buy essentials—eggs, yogurt, tulips, soup fixings—and am nourished by kindness and smiles. 

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Is it an odd thing to say I love my grocery store? In the middle of a pandemic, perhaps it’s fitting: these folks are among the essential workers who are keeping the rest of us fed and safe. As I’ve mentioned before, my partner works at the nearest Trader Joe’s, and I’m feeling extra grateful for him and his colleagues this week.

Since I moved to Eastie, I’ve been cobbling together grocery-store runs: picking up a few things on my way home from work, borrowing a friend’s car or using grocery delivery for bigger trips. But when my guy got a job at TJs back in the winter, I bought a rolling cart and started doing my weekly shops over there. These days, it’s an integral part of my week.

I make my list, go and wait in line (a short one, if I’m lucky), greet his coworkers as I walk through the produce section. I usually pick up some flowers to supplement my weekly bouquets from Brattle Square. There are always new treats to try (see above), plus reliable staples, and I sneak in a hug from my guy if he’s stocking the shelves or working the cash register. The store atmosphere is cheery and bright, and many of his coworkers recognize me now, even with a mask. I wave hello or chat with whoever’s ringing me up, then haul my groceries on the train back home.

Real talk: it’s sometimes a pain, and grocery shopping for one can feel a bit depressing. But we all need to eat, and I’m thankful to have a store I like nearby. I’m even more grateful for the community there: it’s good to walk in and be welcomed.

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Yesterday, I went to Trader Joe’s to do my weekly grocery shop, as I’ve been doing for the past few weeks. Boston has several Trader Joe’s locations, one of which – the tiniest one – is down the street from my office. (I’ve grown used to dropping in there a few times a week for snacks and essentials, and I miss it, these days.)

My guy works at the newest TJ’s, in the seaport district, across the water from where I live in Eastie. It’s comforting, on the days when I know he’s working a morning shift, to look out my kitchen windows and know he’s there on the other side of the harbor.

Grocery shopping looks different these days: the line to get into the store stretches down the block, with customers standing in ones and twos, six to eight feet apart on the sidewalk. There is still no toilet paper (I’ve been getting mine from the bodega near my house). This week, the employees and many of the customers wore masks.

When I moved to Boston, I hadn’t spent much time at Trader Joe’s (they still haven’t made it to West Texas). My friend Fei Ying, who lived near the big TJ’s store in Brookline, used to rave about everything from their potstickers to their produce, and I teased her about her “addiction.” I get it now: the selection is good, the prices are fair, the employees are friendly, and the products are delicious. (My sister is obsessed with their Marcona truffle almonds; I’m partial to their crumbly English cheddar and their dark chocolate peanut butter cups.)

I came home yesterday with a backpack and two bags full of produce, baking staples and other essentials – plus two bunches of purple tulips, which are now split among three different vases in my apartment. In these strange days, grocery shopping feels both normal and decidedly off-kilter. But I’m grateful for a store that has what I need, that’s relatively easy to get to without a car, and where I am sure of a welcome from someone I love. And I owe – we all owe – the staff and managers a deep debt of gratitude.

How are you grocery shopping (or not) in these times?

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