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Posts Tagged ‘Muppets’

clue film cast

The hubs and I recently watched Clue, for the first time in a while. We quote it incessantly (“Flames on the side of my face!” “Well, to make a long story short…” “Too late!”) but it had been several years since we’d enjoyed it in full. If you love the board game, the ’80s or ridiculously campy humor, I highly recommend it.

Afterward, I mentioned a trend I’ve noticed recently: Most of our favorite movies involve a lot of yelling.

I don’t mean my favorite movies (You’ve Got Mail, The Sound of Music) or his favorite movies (Schindler’s List, Field of Dreams). I mean our favorite movies: the ones we love to watch together. The ones we quote on a daily or weekly basis. The ones that make up a substantial part of our vernacular, along with a few beloved TV shows: Friends, Castle and Modern Family, which also frequently get loud.

A partial list: The Emperor’s New Groove. (“Yay! I’m a llama again!”) Pirates of the Caribbean. (“Why is the rum gone?!”) Monty Python and the Holy Grail. (“I don’t know that!”) The Princess Bride. (“Inconceivable!”) The original Star Wars films, both for the battle scenes and C-3PO’s incessant cries of “We’re doomed!” And, of course, anything and everything involving the Muppets. Even White Christmas, thanks to Danny Kaye, has its fair share of shouting. Honorable mentions include The Money Pit, Singin’ in the Rain (Cosmo Brown!) and the old Pink Panther films starring Peter Sellers as Inspector Clouseau.

Some of it’s a function of the genres we watch together. Adventure and comedy films inevitably involve a fair bit of noise: explosions, shouting matches, attempts to save the world – or just the day – gone horribly wrong. (The Muppets’ adventures tend to include all of the above.) There’s also a lot of winking at the camera: whether the characters overtly break the fourth wall (or smash right through it, in the case of the Muppets), the audience is almost always in on the joke.

I can’t forget the nostalgia factor, of course – we’ve loved and quoted a lot of these movies, especially New Groove, Pirates and Clue, since our college days. And honestly, a lot of times it’s pure escapism. I usually don’t have a socially acceptable reason to scream at the top of my lungs, but it cracks me up when my favorite characters do it: “They don’t KNOW we know they know we know!”

I love a sweet romantic comedy or a beautifully shot epic saga as much as the next viewer. My husband is partial to dark psychological thrillers, which, frankly, creep me out. But if we’re on the couch together, you can usually find us watching something funny. And cracking up when things get loud.

Do you notice any oddball themes in your favorite movies?

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central park rowboats nyc

Ah, New York in the fall. It makes me want to buy school supplies. (And send bouquets of newly sharpened pencils to charming Internet friends.)

Seriously – the hubs and I hopped down to NYC in mid-October for a long weekend, and it was, as always, delightful.

We arrived Friday night and settled into our apartment – a charming retreat (found via Airbnb) in Prospect Heights, Brooklyn.

living room brooklyn apartment

Our hostess recommended Chavela’s, promising that the Mexican dishes there would meet even our Texan-snob standards. She was right.

chavelas brooklyn interior

Guacamole + sangria + enchiladas = mucho delicioso.

enchiladas chavelas brooklyn

On our way home, we stopped in at Forte, a brand-new cafe (they’d been open three days!) for apple cider and pumpkin cheesecake. Delicious.

katie forte pumpkin cheesecake

Saturday morning found us checking out the Brooklyn Flea – sadly under-attended due to chilly rain. But J did make a new friend.

jer pink elephant brooklyn flea

We dropped in at the Greenlight Bookstore, a favorite discovery on our last trip to Brooklyn, and popped in to see the Greene Grape’s new digs. (And to split a zucchini-cranberry-chocolate-chip muffin. Wow.)

greenlight bookstore brooklyn

We headed to the West Village later, enjoying chai and a lemon scone at Ciao for Now, then wandered the tangled streets for a while. We ended up, not surprisingly, at a bookstore – Three Lives & Co.

three lives and co bookstore nyc

Its cozy space is chock full of fascinating books. I could have browsed for hours.

We then caught the subway up to Lincoln Center, because the on-site library branch had an exhibit I had to see.

count von count sesame street nypl

Blueprints from the original Sesame Street set, sheet music for “Rubber Duckie” and “Bein’ Green”…

rubber duckie sesame street sheet music

…all kinds of cool Henson/Sesame Workshop trivia, and half a dozen of our favorite Muppets (including Super Grover, in the clouds!).

 

super grover sesame street nypl

We left with smiles on our faces (noting on the way out that the exhibit is “brought to you by the letters N, Y, P and L”).

jer cookie monster

After a bit of shopping and wandering in the neighborhood, we walked up to the Upper West Side for dinner at a sidewalk cafe.

piccolo cafe nyc upper west side

I’m still not sure if the maitre’d’s Italian accent was real, but the pasta and wine were delicious.

katie wine piccolo cafe nyc

After dinner, we headed up to West 83rd Street, to a place I’d walked by but never entered.

cafe lalo exterior nyc

For the uninitiated, Cafe Lalo is the setting for an important scene in You’ve Got Mail – when Kathleen Kelly arranges to meet her Internet admirer and is shocked to see her nemesis Joe Fox instead. (The railings outside are the scene of Fox’s mini-freakout before he walks in: “She had to be! She had to be!”)

Our experience wasn’t that dramatic (thank goodness), but the desserts are out of this world.

raspberry delight cafe lalo

Sated and satisfied, we headed back to Brooklyn for a cozy night in.

More New York photos and stories to come.

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book culture shop interior nyc

Alone in the Kitchen with an Eggplant: Confessions of Cooking for One and Dining Alone, ed. Jenni Ferrari-Adler
I loved this collection of essays on solo dining and cooking, featuring writers ranging from Laurie Colwin to Ann Patchett to several folks I’d never heard of. Some folks cook gourmet meals for themselves; some folks cobble together leftovers; some folks make the same comfort food over and over. (I made Amanda Hesser’s “single cuisine” eggs recently.) Essay collections can be uneven, but every single piece here is delicious.

The Girl You Left Behind, Jojo Moyes
I loved Moyes’ previous novel, Me Before You, and also loved this story. Edouard Lefevre, a French artist, paints a portrait of his wife, Sophie, before leaving to fight in World War I. Sophie and her sister are forced to cook for the occupying German forces, whose Kommandant is fascinated by the painting. Decades later, the painting hangs in widow Liv Halston’s ultramodern London home, a gift from her husband. When the artist’s family brings a lawsuit, claiming the painting was stolen, Liv delves into Sophie’s history to prove it wasn’t. Page-turning, heart-tugging and rich with historical detail.

Have His Carcase, Dorothy Sayers
Harriet Vane, recovering from a murder trial (detailed in Strong Poison), escapes to a quiet coastal town, where she promptly finds a dead body abandoned on a rock. The body is soon washed away by the tide, but Harriet mounts an investigation. Lord Peter Wimsey, who never can keep his long nose out of a mystery, arrives shortly and the pair of them pursue the case up and down the coast. Engaging and fun, full of red herrings and witty exchanges between Harriet and Lord Peter.

Jim Henson: The Biography, Brian Jay Jones
It is difficult to overstate my love for the Muppets. I grew up on Sesame Street, and I love the Muppet movies and The Muppet Show – the whole Muppet world. I especially adore Kermit the Frog, who was in many ways Jim Henson’s alter ego. This brand-new biography of Henson – packed with quotes from Frank Oz, Henson’s wife and children, and many others who knew him well – was utterly fascinating. The last chapter, which detailed Jim’s memorial service, made me weep. Thoroughly researched and so much fun.

Heirs and Graces, Rhys Bowen
Lady Georgiana Rannoch (Her Royal Spyness) is invited to a stately home in Kent to help groom the duke’s new Australian heir for high society. But the duke soon ends up dead, stabbed by the heir’s hunting knife – and complicated family politics give several people motive for murder. The plot of this one fell rather flat, and I missed Georgie’s Cockney grandfather, who only made a cameo. Not my favorite of the series, though still fun.

Early Decision: Based on a True Frenzy, Lacy Crawford
I picked up this novel after reading Lindsey’s glowing review. Anne works as an independent college admissions counselor, assisting wealthy high schoolers and their parents with applications and essays. But while she helps her students find their voices and take charge of their own lives, she’s stuck in a holding pattern, afraid to pursue a different career or find real love. Crawford’s writing is sharp, insightful and compassionate, and her characters come alive through their essays. Thought-provoking and wonderful.

Wonder, R.J. Palacio
August “Auggie” Pullman was born with a severe facial deformity, so he’s always been homeschooled. But now he’s starting fifth grade at Beecher Prep, and all he wants is to be treated like a normal kid. Narrated alternately by Auggie, his older sister Via and their friends, Wonder traces Auggie’s journey through the school year, from science projects and English class to the social politics of the lunchroom. Heartbreaking, funny and ultimately hopeful.

Fangirl, Rainbow Rowell
I loved Rowell’s Attachments, and loved this book too. Cath Avery is a shy, confused college freshman, overwhelmed by the new world she finds herself in. She retreats into what she’s always loved: writing fanfiction about Simon Snow (a Harry Potter-esque magician). Her twin sister, Wren, is pulling away from her; her surly roommate’s ex-boyfriend is awfully cute; and she’s worried about her dad, left all alone in Omaha. A sweet, funny coming-of-age story and a fun look into the world of fanfiction.

Rose Under Fire, Elizabeth Wein
I loved Wein’s Code Name Verity – this novel is a companion to it. Rose Justice, American transport pilot and aspiring poet, gets captured by the Nazis and sent to Ravensbruck, where she and a tough, ragtag group of women work together to subvert the SS guards and stay alive. Heartbreaking (and told in horrifying detail), the story extends from the camps to the Nuremberg trials after the war. Sobering and yet stubbornly hopeful.

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April (in case you hadn’t heard) is National Poetry Month, and on Fridays this month I’ll be featuring some of my favorite poems. I thought I’d kick things off with some original performance poetry from my old friends the Muppets:

Totally worth watching to the end. It’ll crack you up.

Who are your favorite poems and/or poets?

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I’m a longtime fan of Sesame Street, cookies and Christmas – so this montage of Cookie Monster attempting to ask Santa for cookies is just about perfect. (From Christmas Eve on Sesame Street, which my parents taped off TV about 20 years ago. We still have the creaky old VHS tape, complete with commercials, and we still watch the clips below, and Grover playing Santa, every year.)

 

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Because life can get altogether too serious sometimes, don’t you think? Here, a list of silly things that make me smile:

1. The Muppets. In pretty much any form – whether it’s YouTube videos, episodes of The Muppet Show or the Sesame Street Twitter feed.
2. Mutts – the comic strip following the adventures of Mooch the cat, his friend Earl the dog and their pals.
3. Sprinkles on my ice cream. (And the fact that Northeasterners call them “jimmies.”)
4. Polka dots. They’re just so happy.
5. The Aflac duck (who is also on Twitter).
6. Veggie Tales. (Clearly I’m easily entertained by kids’ shows.)
7. My husband. (Yes, he’s silly.)
8. Our friends. (Ditto.)
9. Puppies, wherever I encounter them.
10. Blog posts of utter hilarity, like this one from Joey. (Actually, this one made me hoot with laughter.)

What silly things make you smile?

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I’ve gushed before about my love for the Muppets – I grew up watching Sesame Street, became a fan of the movies in college (thanks to Jeremiah), and watched three seasons of the show last fall. I can’t get enough of these musical, goofy, completely adorable characters and their antics. (We watch our favorite Muppet videos on YouTube regularly.) I especially adore Kermit the Frog.

So – in case you hadn’t heard – they’re making a new Muppet movie. And yesterday I saw this:

Doesn’t it look fantastic?

I cannot WAIT.

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